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The cost to change a toilet

A 50plus guide to the cost of maintenance and repair work

0845 22 50 495 or one of our local numbers
Book online and check rates in your area here


   
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What are we talking about? How long does it typically take to replace a whole toilet or part thereof?
Typical time 2 hrs cistern only, 4 hrs toilet
Dependencies Being able to turn the water off
Questions to ask Is there an isolating valve? If not does the customer know where the main stop cock is? Is there a roof tank (in older properties toilets were often fed from the roof tank). Make sure the cistern and pipework is accessible. In some modern properties they are boxed in and /or tiled in which case the main task is getting access!

Comments

There are two main types of cistern: loose coupled meaning there is a pipe between the cistern and the toilet bowl and close coupled, meaning the cistern sits on top of the back of the bowl. Close coupled toilets are more common. Many now come with dual flush mechanisms to reduce water usage. Adjustments to the water supply pipe work are often required. Like for like pipe connections make the job faster. An isolating valve should be fitted to comply with water supply regulations if one is not present. If there is no isolating valve the water supply needs to be turned off.

Close coupled cisterns, even if the bowl is not changed, will require a new 'doughnut' fitting (this is the seal between the cistern and bowl).

If the toilet bowl is also to be replaced then it is likely that a new outflow connection will be required as the seals on these deteriorate over time.

Any issues with the stop cock could extend the time required. Likewise if the toilet has been in situ for a long time deteriorated pipework or fixings can extend the time required.

Three points of note:

  • many modern toilets don't need the cistern overflow (as they overflow into the bowl) so an old one will need cutting back and sealing off
  • new cisterns are often smaller than the older type so think in terms of decorations if the old cistern has been painted around
  • a new toilet will differ in size from the old one so if you have flooring cut around the toilet bowl then you will need to consider options in this regard.

 

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